According to WineSearcher.com, both of these wines are available at a few retailers in New York.

Made from 100% Pinot Nero grapes, the Barone Pizzini 2009 Franciacorta Rosé Brut is one of my personal favorites in the winery’s portfolio.

Last year, when I tasted the 2010 with the winery’s general manager, Silvano Brescianini, I told him that “my wife could possibly cheat on me with this wine.” It’s just so good and so decadent.

Last night, when we opened the 2009, paired with some gardiniera and lightly toasted bread, the fruit had that Technicolor quality that you only find in organically raised wines like this. It was that brilliant.

Red berry and even some white fruit notes, held together with a beautiful, delicate salinity (a hallmark of great Franciacorta). The wine was as good in on the nose and on the palate as it was gorgeous to behold in the glass.

Spectacular wine.

The non-vintage Franciacorta Brut is made mostly from Chardonnay with a smaller amount of Pinot Nero.

Most hold that Chardonnay is one of the world’s most transparent grapes and that no variety better expresses the character of the terroir where the wine is raised.

To my palate, this wine was a perfect example of that. Fresh and bright on the nose and on the palate, it had that subtle herbaceous character that — in my experience — sets the wines of Franciacorta apart from Italy’s other classic-method wines.

I’m a terrible blind taster, but I could have easily picked this out as Franciacorta were I forced to taste it blind.

A superb example of what Franciacorta should be and a great wine for the classic lake fish dishes they serve there.

I loved both of them and highly recommend them to you.

—Jeremy Parzen
blog master

 

 

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